Menu

9:00 AM 5th Annual AXIS Golf Tournament
1:00 PM – 4:00 PM Exhibitor Setup
5:00 PM Exhibits Open
5:00 PM – 6:30 PM Hors d’oeuvres & Networking Reception

 

Intensive Learning Special Event 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM

The Willow Institute in collaboration with C4 Recovery Foundation proudly presents Advancing Women Leaders in Behavioral Health: Masterclass in Leadership Development

Cherlyne Short Majors, PhD

The relative shortage of female leadership presents an urgent challenge to the behavioral health sector. Technological, financial, legislative, and other factors are advancing and furthering the industry, making gender equality advances paramount. As a group representing half of the targeted treatment population, women should be strategically involved at the highest level in terms of creating new structures, modalities, and paradigms for how treatment is defined, delivered, regulated, and compensated. Women have a unique perspective that is necessary for steering the behavioral health community through the current and upcoming waves of change and transforming present challenges into opportunities for growth.
The first portion of the 2018 Master Classes will focus on essential factors for leadership success and career advancement. Empowered, high-performing women leaders will share global, practical and personal steps necessary on the road to Leadership. During this class, women will have lecture material and small group experiences, allowing for discovery of current opportunities in the field, as well as guidance on how to follow one’s bliss.

The critical mass indicates that the time is right for women to step up and help guide the future of behavioral health’s choices about how clients are treated, how businesses are structured and operated to comply with legislative policy, how organizations remain ethical and healthy fiscally, and how the economical delivery of quality series can remain sustainable.

 

Opening Plenary 6:30 PM – 8:30 PM

 

Warm Handoff Policies and Programs: Collaborative Efforts to Intervene and Treat Addiction

Michael C. Barnes, Esq
Sponsored by: DCBA Law & Policy

Drug overdose in the U.S. is now at an all-time high and continues to increase year to year at record rates. The social and economic impacts of the epidemic have reverberated through every corner of the country, taking a heavy toll on individuals, their families, and the communities in which they live. Unfortunately, it is not uncommon to read about someone who survived an overdose, only to suffer a subsequent fatal overdose within hours of being released from the emergency department. These stories represent a failure to intervene and initiate treatment at a point when individuals are often most vulnerable and at risk of subsequent overdose. A successful emergence from this epidemic will depend in large part on the ability to intervene and refer individuals with substance use disorders (SUDs) to effective treatment. A warm handoff is the process of transitioning a patient with a SUD from an intercept point, such as a hospital or law-enforcement setting, to a treatment provider once the patient is stable. Warm handoffs provide those with SUDs a pathway to treatment and recovery, and can decrease the risk of subsequent overdose. This presentation will discuss warm handoff programs; recent state warm handoff legislation and the potential impacts of such legislation; the need for the adoption of warm handoff policies by emergency departments; and legal issues surrounding warm handoffs, including the timing of treatment initiation and federal patient privacy protections. The presenter will discuss the vital roles that law enforcement, local treatment programs, and peer recovery support specialists can play in making warm handoff programs effective. By working together, stakeholders, including emergency departments, law enforcement, treatment providers, and the recovery community, can implement meaningful interventions and deliver quality treatment to help reduce active addiction and overdose, strengthen community ties, and improve public health and safety.

 

Back to Top

7:30 AM – 8:30 AM Breakfast in the Exhibit Area
8:30 AM – 10:00 AM Monday Morning Keynotes

 

Executive and Clinical Keynote: Mission vs. Margin

Nancy O’Donnell MA, LPC, CSAT, CCTP; Jack O’Donnell
Sponsored by: C4 Recovery Foundation

Mission vs. Margin is an important concept that requires sophisticated thinking that moves beyond financial collateral and purpose statements. As the treatment industry faces the very public challenge presented by the opioid crisis; executives and clinical leaders will be faced with the challenge of navigating the myriad difficult situations that impact both their organization’s financial margin and their mission of providing high-quality healthcare services. This interactive discussion between a CEO and a Vice President of Clinical Services focuses on the daily challenges of providing the complex and costly clinical needs of the patient and the corresponding challenges the organization faces to maintain a profit structure. The sustainability of the organization is the very real struggle to maintain your pledged “mission” versus the need to create profit “margin”. Some following real-life challenges and resolutions will be discussed.

 

Business Development Keynote: Ethical Communications in Marketing Part 1

Harry Nelson, Esq.
Sponsored by: American Addiction Treatment Association (AATA)

In this course, you examine the fundamental questions, “What is ethical communications in marketing?” and “Why is it so important?” With legal and marketing experts as your guides, you explore key issues related to ethical communications in marketing through the lens of state and federal regulations, including the Federal Trade Commission. You consider how to best promote transparent, truthful, and substantiated marketing statements while avoiding false, misleading, and unfair ones. You also examine the increasingly important role of professional ethics as it relates to social networking and social media.

 

Morning Break in the Exhibit Hall 10:00 AM – 10:45 AM

 

Monday Morning Topic Forums 10:45 AM – 12:15 PM

 

Executive Forum
Clinical Forum
Business Development Forum: Part 2

 

Monday Luncheon 12:15 PM – 1:45 PM

 

Building a Trauma-Informed Workplace

Donna White, RN, PhD, CS, CADAC
Sponsored by: MGH/UMASS BOSTON

Working with survivors of trauma can be extremely rewarding, but can also be challenging. Without direct attention to the needs of care providers, providing services to trauma survivors can increase the risk for burnout, vicarious trauma, and secondary traumatic stress as well as being a serious occupational hazard. This presentation discusses the premise that exposure to the traumatic experiences of other people—known as vicarious trauma—is an inevitable occupational challenge for the fields of victim services, emergency medical services, fire services, law enforcement, and other allied professionals; however, organizations can mitigate the potentially negative effects of trauma exposure by becoming vicarious trauma-informed. External factors and stressors can add to the risk; bearing witness to human suffering and adversity can be deeply impactful. Reactivity related to unresolved trauma among workers can make working conditions more difficult and can undermine health and safety. A police officer’s twenty-plus years of “peacetime combat” wreaks a heavy toll personally and professionally. The prevalence of compassion fatigue ranges from 7.3% to 40% of workers in intensive care settings and 25% to 70% among inexperienced behavioral health professionals. The higher prevalence is often seen in health professionals who repeatedly witness and care for people after trauma. No human being, no matter how healthy, well trained, or well adjusted, is immune to the long-term effects of cumulative stress or sudden critical incidents. Providing effective and sensitive trauma‐informed care requires an emotionally healthy, competent, and well supported workforce. Join us in discussing methodologies to identify various patterns stress in the workplace, and strategies to promote wellness, recovery, and a renewed sense of identity, purpose, and strength as a caring professional. Leadership will review tools and resources tailored specifically to these fields that provide the knowledge and skills necessary for organizations to address the vicarious trauma needs of their staff.

 

Monday Afternoon Keynotes 2:00 PM – 3:30 PM

 

Executive and Clinical Keynote: Strategic Partnerships: Surviving and Thriving in a Changing Behavioral Healthcare Marketplace

Matt Feehery, MBA, LCDC, AADC
Sponsored by: PaRC – Prevention & Recovery Center

The reimbursement climate continues to change, consumer needs and expectations are changing, quality and consistency vary widely from provider to provider, market disruptors are impacting the business and treatment landscape, public trust of treatment industry motives and practices is softening–and the list goes on. Can treatment providers better position their businesses to remain relevant and thrive in the midst of constant change and unpredictability? Organizations must be innovative, adapting to change by becoming more nimble and re-scripting treatment models and practices currently in place. Formal and informal partnerships can foster effective collaboration and cooperation between entities, including those with supporting and competing interests such as insurers, employers and providers. Employing these practices where applicable can favorably influence outcomes, improve patient experience and sustain business operations. This session will offer review and discussion on a variety of possible collaborative ventures, treatment models and potential new allies involving public/private and for profit/non-profit partnerships, all toward sustaining ethical addiction treatment businesses.

 

Business Development Keynote: Part 3

Harry Nelson, Esq.
Sponsored by: American Addiction Treatment Association (AATA)

In this course, you examine the fundamental questions, “What is ethical communications in marketing?” and “Why is it so important?” With legal and marketing experts as your guides, you explore key issues related to ethical communications in marketing through the lens of state and federal regulations, including the Federal Trade Commission. You consider how to best promote transparent, truthful, and substantiated marketing statements while avoiding false, misleading, and unfair ones. You also examine the increasingly important role of professional ethics as it relates to social networking and social media.

 

Afternoon Break in the Exhibit Hall 3:30 PM – 4:15 PM

 

Monday Afternoon Topic Forums 4:15 PM – 5:45 PM

 

Executive Forum
Clinical Forum
Business Development Forum: Part 4

 

Back to Top

7:30 AM – 8:30 AM Breakfast in the Exhibit Area
8:30 AM – 10:00 AM Tuesday Morning Keynotes

 

Executive and Clinical Keynote: Measurement Based Care

David Mee-Lee, MD; Scott Williams, PsyD; Michael Johnson, MA, CAP
Sponsored by: The Joint Commision & CARF International

There has been much emphasis on the use of evidence-based practice. But with the rise of value-based payment, funding for outcomes not just service delivery; and population health, there is a need to move beyond evidence-based practice toward “practice-based evidence” and “measurement-based practice”.

This panel will review the current pressures in healthcare reform that fuel changes in how to deliver, fund and measure the effectiveness of services in behavioral health. It will highlight what accreditation organizations (Joint Commission and CARF) are doing to increase the quality of the care, treatment, and services provided by their accredited organizations; and assist attendees in what next steps to take to use data to drive outcomes and quality.

 

Business Development Keynote: Ethical Compensation Practices in Healthcare Marketing Part 1

Harry Nelson, Esq.
Sponsored by: American Addiction Treatment Association (AATA)

In this course, you examine the fundamental questions, “What are ethical compensation practices in healthcare marketing?” and “Why are they so important?” With legal experts as your guides, you explore legal and ethical best practices related to contracts and client rights, compensation of marketers, and call centers and lead generation. You also consider how to avoid common compensation pitfalls, such as fraud and abuse, exploitation, inducements, brokering, and kickbacks.

 

Morning Break in the Exhibit Hall 10:00 AM – 10:45 AM

 

Tuesday Morning Topic Forums 10:45 AM – 12:15 PM

 

Executive Forum
Clinical Forum
Business Development Forum: Part 2

 

Tuesday Luncheon 12:15 PM – 1:45 PM

 

The Straight and Narrow Bottom Line: Law and Ethics Related to Third-Party Payment

Michael C. Barnes, Esq
Sponsored by: DCBA Law & Policy

This presentation – led by an experienced health care attorney who advises addiction treatment programs and urine drug testing laboratories – will include an overview of laws, regulations, policies, and ethics related to payment from private and public third-parties. The discussion will touch on the Federal Anti-Kickback Statute, state anti-kickback and fee-splitting statutes, the criminal health care fraud statute, False Claims Act, and the Affordable Care Act. This presentation will provide a timely discussion of the legal issues regarding the utilization of, and billing for, urine drug testing, including billing fraud and pass-through billing arrangements with clinical laboratories; collecting insurance payments made directly to patients; assignment of benefits; insurance enrollment; and copayment collection. Applying his practical experience and recent case law, enforcement trends, and legislation, the presenter will provide attendees with an understanding of how treatment programs and laboratories can comply with relevant laws and regulations, obtain reasonable payment, and ensure that safeguards are in place to protect the safety of patients and prevent civil and criminal liability.

 

Tuesday Afternoon Keynotes 2:00 PM – 3:30 PM

 

Maximizing Margins: An Ethical Approach to Billing, Payor Diversity, & New Business Growth

Jonathan De Carlo, CAC-III; Keith Booher, MBA; Ian Gershman, MBA, CADC
Sponsored by: C4 Consulting and MedPro Billing

In the contemporary landscape, the shifting sands of margin management are a moving target at the foundation of every business. Learning to respond to the conditions of payor sources and stabilizing growth in operating margins presents as an evolving objective. While discussing the challenges of payor mix and payor balance, this presentation will examine current trends in insurance billing and coding and explore the ethical boundaries on common practices. We will provide examples of billing criteria for various codes and criteria from major commercial payor sources that are required We will explore examples of how to capture current services being offered by providers for new billing opportunities through an ethical lens. In addition, we will explore shifts in payor mix, examine in-network and out of network insurance trends, and explore new business growth opportunities available in public and private sectors.

 

Business Development Keynote: Part 3

Harry Nelson, Esq.
Sponsored by: American Addiction Treatment Association (AATA)

In this course, you examine the fundamental questions, “What are ethical compensation practices in healthcare marketing?” and “Why are they so important?” With legal experts as your guides, you explore legal and ethical best practices related to contracts and client rights, compensation of marketers, and call centers and lead generation. You also consider how to avoid common compensation pitfalls, such as fraud and abuse, exploitation, inducements, brokering, and kickbacks.

 

Afternoon Break in the Exhibit Hall 3:30 PM – 4:15 PM

 

Tuesday Afternoon Topic Forums 4:15 PM – 5:45 PM

 

Executive Forum
Clinical Forum
Business Development Forum: Part 4

 

Back to Top

7:30 AM – 8:30 AM Breakfast in the Exhibit Area
8:30 AM – 10:00 AM Wednesday Morning Keynote

 

Livin’ on the Edge: A Model for Leading Edge Treatment and Culture

Ilana Zivkovich, LCSW, LCDC, CDWF
Sponsored by: Northbound Treatment Services

As treatment providers, we share the common goal of effectively helping clients live fulfilling, healthy, happy lives. The In Vivo (or “in life”) model of treatment empowers clients with appropriate opportunities to experience the joys, challenges, stresses, and successes of “real life” while within the supportive treatment environment. In this interactive workshop, key teachings from Positive Psychology, Cue Exposure Therapy, and cutting-edge brain science will be synthesized as the theoretical foundation of this model is explored. Additionally, the rationale behind emphasizing a healthy organizational culture, as well as the elements necessary to sustain it will be covered. Drawing from the research of Dr. Brené Brown, participants will learn about trust, vulnerability and courage as they relate to organizational culture. Attendees will leave enriched through exposure to cutting edge research to enhance both their overall approach to addressing addictions, as well as their style of engagement within their professional lives.

 

Morning Break in the Exhibit Hall 10:00 AM – 10:30 AM

 

Wednesday Closing Keynote 10:30 AM – 12:00 PM

 

Harnessing the Power of Health IT

Joel C. White
Sponsored by: Health IT Now

Telehealth is transforming the healthcare system – allowing providers to deliver services when and where patients need them, thereby improving outcomes and lowering costs but Fewer than half of behavioral health providers possess fully implemented clinical electronic health information systems. On average, health IT spending in behavioral health organizations represents just 1.8% of total operating budgets — compared with 3.5% of total operating budgets for general health care services provider organizations. If behavioral health providers cannot adopt health IT at a rate comparable with primary care facilities, hospitals and physicians, it soon will become impossible to provide clinical care coordination for this important patient population, which requires regular interaction between mental health and addiction providers, primary care physicians and specialty medical personnel. Health IT will benefit patients while supporting health care providers to make smart decisions about their patient’s care, all while lowering administrative and clinical costs through care coordination, administrative simplification, duplicate test reduction and enhanced clinical decision support. We will discuss the political landscape regarding HIT policies, adoption of health information technology (HIT), including interoperable electronic health records (EHRs) and the use of other electronic training, assessment, treatment, monitoring, and recovery support tools, to ensure high-quality integrated health care, appropriate specialty care, improved patient/consumer engagement, and effective prevention and wellness strategies.

 

Back to Top

  • AXIS is a conference signed by and for industry clinicians and executives. The emphasis is on substance, not flash. True collaboration and learning make it a special conference.


  • AXIS is the best conference for the latest trends in behavioral health and learning what industry leaders are doing to position their organizations for the future.


  • Great executive track most worthwhile for CEO's.


  • The AXIS Conference has improved year after year. Content is critical and meaningful to current issues. The time allowed for networking and peer collaboration is most beneficial.


  • This is a unique conference experience. There is something for every level of program leadership. To describe the AXIS experience would be a disservice; you need to attend and participate to truly appreciated the AXIS experience and value.